2014 Salsa Beargrease Carbon
The cutting edge of cutting edge.

2014 Salsa Beargrease Carbon

The cutting edge of cutting edge.

kdayracing:

Legs. We’ve been together from the beginning. You’ve taken me to many places, both near and far. Across mountain passes close to home and in foreign countries.
You’ve endured every condition imaginable. Been dusted and spit upon from the salts of the earth. Sunburn, razor burn and everything in between.
There are times when we’ve celebrated victories and times when we’ve gone down in a fiery blaze. Every fiber seized and immobile. But somehow, you continue to fire and always move us forward, even when every ounce of me wants to give up.
Legs. Thank you for the adventures. For the infinite miles we have and will continue to travel. Thank you for moving us forward and over mountain passes. I certainly hope you enjoy the ride as much as I do.

kdayracing:

Legs. We’ve been together from the beginning. You’ve taken me to many places, both near and far. Across mountain passes close to home and in foreign countries.

You’ve endured every condition imaginable. Been dusted and spit upon from the salts of the earth. Sunburn, razor burn and everything in between.

There are times when we’ve celebrated victories and times when we’ve gone down in a fiery blaze. Every fiber seized and immobile. But somehow, you continue to fire and always move us forward, even when every ounce of me wants to give up.

Legs. Thank you for the adventures. For the infinite miles we have and will continue to travel. Thank you for moving us forward and over mountain passes. I certainly hope you enjoy the ride as much as I do.

EASTON EA90SL FREEHUB MODIFICATION

This quick and simple modification can turn your silent wheels into loud, nice sounding high end wheels, and only takes about 5 minutes!

This is the sound of a 2012 EA90 SL R4 type hub with the freehub pawl spring replaced with one from a Campagnolo/Fulcrum Freehub. The ratcheting on the rear hub before this mod, was effectively silent. I took the Fulcrum freehub pawl spring, a small ring that holds the pawls in the outward position, and replaced the Easton spring. The Easton pawl spring, which was slightly larger and less stiff, resulted in a wimpy, near-silent freehub sound. The Fulcrum pawl spring was smaller and stiffer, placing the pawls in a more tensioned position, which created a loud ratcheting noise. 

I then removed most of the medium weight grease in the hub body and replaced it with a light coating of Phil Wood grease, to further create more noise. Sealed the hub back up and PRESTO! Loud freehub.

This modification can be done to any normal pawl-type hub that allows the easy removal of the freehub body. MANY other videos will show you how to do this.

It’s a relatively simple modification to do and only requires a few basic tools, and lightweight grease. Different pawl springs from different manufacturers will result in differing freehub tones. For example, Novatec and Sun Ringlé pawl springs tend to be louder, and my friends have had success with using other brands on their own bikes. The amount of grease applied to the freehub will change how loud it is. While the freehub will be loudest without grease, it is not recommended to use no grease in the hub.

If you wish to purchase a Campagnolo pawl spring for your rear hub, visit this link:

http://www.jensonusa.com/Campagnolo-910-Speed-Freehub-Body-Parts

I really appreciate John Prolly’s series of “Beautiful Bikes”. The bikes he photographs are not glossy and perfect as in advertisements, but weathered and used; personal cycles with the spark of craftsmanship showing through in small details. They are almost never stock bicycles.
There is a beauty to a handmade object that develops a patina with use. The juxtaposition of both old and new componentry on the bike adds to the detail of age. It reminds us that there is not only a story behind each bike, but as a bike is used, it become an intensely personal object that reflects the actions and transformation of the rider that have taken place above each gouge, each chip of paint and patch of oxidation.

Indeed, such bicycles may not look like much to the untrained eye, but to the avid followers of cycling, the ones who ride hard, day-in, day-out, these humble details speak volumes about the rider without so much as a word.

I really appreciate John Prolly’s series of “Beautiful Bikes”. The bikes he photographs are not glossy and perfect as in advertisements, but weathered and used; personal cycles with the spark of craftsmanship showing through in small details. They are almost never stock bicycles.

There is a beauty to a handmade object that develops a patina with use. The juxtaposition of both old and new componentry on the bike adds to the detail of age. It reminds us that there is not only a story behind each bike, but as a bike is used, it become an intensely personal object that reflects the actions and transformation of the rider that have taken place above each gouge, each chip of paint and patch of oxidation.


Indeed, such bicycles may not look like much to the untrained eye, but to the avid followers of cycling, the ones who ride hard, day-in, day-out, these humble details speak volumes about the rider without so much as a word.
Part of the (often touted as insane) cost of bicycles comes from not only the craftsmanship, but the design process and precision fabrication that goes into each individual part.
Bicycles are precision machines. There are extremely close tolerances in bicycle hardware that are upheld by exceedingly high quality standards. Any small defect in any part of the bicycle, because of the incredible interdependency of each individual component, can cause a danger to the rider or a sub-par ride.
When you really think about it, each individual part on a bicycle may have traveled thousands of miles, from being mined out of the ground to being formed and packed and shipped to join the rest to become a whole. And the sum of these miles traveled may be thousands upon thousands.
Cumulatively, a bike has already seen the world before even being ridden.

Part of the (often touted as insane) cost of bicycles comes from not only the craftsmanship, but the design process and precision fabrication that goes into each individual part.

Bicycles are precision machines. There are extremely close tolerances in bicycle hardware that are upheld by exceedingly high quality standards. Any small defect in any part of the bicycle, because of the incredible interdependency of each individual component, can cause a danger to the rider or a sub-par ride.

When you really think about it, each individual part on a bicycle may have traveled thousands of miles, from being mined out of the ground to being formed and packed and shipped to join the rest to become a whole. And the sum of these miles traveled may be thousands upon thousands.

Cumulatively, a bike has already seen the world before even being ridden.

2013 Ritte Crossberg
Cyclocross is a bizarre, bastard stepchild of a discipline that calls for a bizarre, bastard stepchild of a bike: a good cross bike must be nimble but not too twitchy. Responsive but not too stiff. Light but not too fragile. Enter the all new 2013 Crossberg, reengineered for the battlefield that is cyclocross.
Stiffer, smoother, svelter and more aggressive than last year’s edition, the new Crossberg features a PressFit30 bottom bracket for lighter weight and more crank options, a tapered headtube for front end stiffness, a carefully designed tube set for the right balance of compliance and stiffness, and of course, the meanest all matte paint job this side of the Atlantic. It’s even available with eccentric bottom bracket shell for single speed conversion.
Frameset MSRP: $1850
Availability: September 2012

2013 Ritte Crossberg

Cyclocross is a bizarre, bastard stepchild of a discipline that calls for a bizarre, bastard stepchild of a bike: a good cross bike must be nimble but not too twitchy. Responsive but not too stiff. Light but not too fragile. Enter the all new 2013 Crossberg, reengineered for the battlefield that is cyclocross.

Stiffer, smoother, svelter and more aggressive than last year’s edition, the new Crossberg features a PressFit30 bottom bracket for lighter weight and more crank options, a tapered headtube for front end stiffness, a carefully designed tube set for the right balance of compliance and stiffness, and of course, the meanest all matte paint job this side of the Atlantic. It’s even available with eccentric bottom bracket shell for single speed conversion.

Frameset MSRP: $1850

Availability: September 2012

My father’s 1984 Trek 520 sport touring bike, restored and ridden by me as my first real bicycle. She rides beautifully.